Since coming to the forefront in 2017, the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements have made an indelible mark on Hollywood and on Madison Avenue. My colleagues, James Johnston, Josh Gordon, and Samantha Rothaus wrote a timely piece about the impact in the latest edition of Trends in Marketing Communications Law, Davis & Gilbert’s annual publication surveying the law affecting marketers and their agencies. Though the long-term ramifications of these movements are still playing out, as my colleagues noted, one impact is clear. #MeToo has caused studios and agencies to revive old contractual provisions like the “morals clause” (in addition to popularizing the new “inclusion rider” provision).

Designed to protect a producer’s investment, a morals clause allows the producer … Continue Reading

On Wikipedia, there are two entries for “The Golden Age of Television.” The first describes a period from the late ’40s to late ’50s, which featured live productions aimed at the affluent viewers who could then afford television sets. The second one, we’re living through now.

This shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone who has gotten glued to one of the many gripping series parading across our screens in this new century. From The Sopranos, to Breaking Bad, to Mad Men, it has been an embarrassment of riches.

They say that nothing gold can stay (well, Robert Frost did anyway). That’s a scary thought for viewers, but one that has been articulated by a television executive who … Continue Reading

Maybe you’ve seen them on Instagram or Facebook – pictures of babies dressed up in grown-up suits like so many chubby-cheeked David Byrnes. It’s called “baby suiting,” and it’s the latest photo craze instigated by mom blogger Ilana Wiles, who just a year ago launched a surge of “baby mugging,” which is just what it sounds like (well, maybe not) – taking pictures of babies as though they’re sitting in coffee mugs.

Wiles and her blog – MommyShorts – are part of a growing and influential trend of moms who blog. According to recent research by eMarketer, there are roughly 4.2 million moms who blog, accounting for eighteen percent of all adult bloggers. An established mom blog can have hundreds … Continue Reading